Colorado Higher-Education Interdisciplinary Program - Colorado State University GK-12 Program: A multi-disciplinary research and teaching program in biomedical engineering for discovery and understanding of cell communication

2011-2012 (Year 3) Graduate Fellows

Jaclyn Adkins

Jaclyn Adkins
First-Year Fellow, Chemistry

I am in my third year of PhD Analytical Chemistry program, and this is my second year in the GK-12 program.  My part in the project is to work with the microchip in understanding chemical reactions that occur at the interface between the tissue slice being tested and the sensor (electrode) surface.  Specifically, our goal is to look at the interaction of nitric oxide (NO) at this surface as it is released from tissue slices. I will be involved in calibrating and modifying the electrodes to best detect NO.  A combination of single electrodes in a grid format on the chip will be combined to tell us both spatial and temporal readings from tissue slices.
I am very passionate about teaching because I feel like I am making a direct impact on peoples lives.  I want them to me as excited as I am about learning and the GK-12 program has been fantastic in allowing me to interact with, learn from, and teach so many different people.  Outside of work I enjoy reading, hiking, and riding my motorcycle.  

Cherelle Bishop

Cherelle Bishop
Second-Year Fellow, Chemistry

I am currently working to obtain my masters in analytical and materials chemistry at Colorado State University. My research is focused on quantifying physiologically relevant concentration of nitric oxide (NO) to begin to determine the role that NO plays in cell communication and migration. Specifically, I will be looking to develop methodology to verify the relative amounts of nitric oxide that is stimulating cell movement to then compare to on-chip measurement. This project allows me to use my previous research experience in organic synthesis as well as my passion for analytical instrumentation, as I work to create this verification method. . I completed my BSCh at the University of Denver, where I was involved with Science Club and Making of a Scientist. These two programs allowed me to share my passion for chemistry with middle school and high school students while performing exciting demonstrations that illustrate fundamental chemistry relationships. These experiences has lended to my ability to communicate my research to high school science classes and has made this process so much more enjoyable.I truly love the outdoors and enjoy living in Colorado, especially when I get the chance to go fishing, camping, or hiking.

Highlights from year 1:

  • Demonstrations - Blue Glow and Ammonium Dichormate
  • Polymer Lessons - What is a polymer? and Silly Putty Lab
  • Electrochemistry Lab -- Golden Penny

Matt Duwe

Matt Duwe
Second-Year Fellow, Electrical and Computer Engineering

My name is Matt Duwe and I'm an Electrical Engineering graduate fellow at CSU. My main focus is on studying chip design from both the analog and digital perspective. On the digital side, I am currently working on a transistor level 32-bit adder and multiplier, which will serve as the core of the Digital Signal Processing unit on our chip. On the analog side, I'm designing a potentiostat, which is the electronic control circuit for the electrodes on the biosensor chip.

Outside of the project, my biggest passion is probably sports. I'm a fan of all the Denver sports teams, with my favorite being football. I just got Broncos season tickets finally this year so I'll be at all the games. I also enjoy playing sports like football, basketball, golf, and skiing. I go up to the mountains 10-15 times a year to ski and my favorite resorts are Keystone and Copper. My favorite runs are the double blacks and bowls at Copper.

Krystle Frahm

Krystle Frahm
Second-Year Fellow, Molecular Biology

Krystle Frahm received her bachelors in Psychology and Master's in Health Psychology from Texas State. She is currently in her third year in the Cell & Molecular Biology PhD program in the Tobet Laboratory. Her current research focuses on vascular development in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. She is also working on characterizing an in vitro model for visualizing ovulation in live ovary slices. She is looking forward to further understanding the work being generated by the chemistry and engineering departments on the biosensor chip. She is also eager to enhance the content knowledge of her teacher in the high school as well as improve in her ability to communicate science. When not working in the lab, she enjoys spending time with her dog Max and seeing all that Colorado has to offer.

Katherine Kiwimagi

Katherine Kiwimagi
First-Year Fellow, Bioengineering

I received my Bachelors in Biology with an emphasis in the cell and molecular, minor in Chemistry and minor in Music from the University of Northern Colorado, UNC. I am currently pursuing my Masters in Biomedical Engineering at Colorado State University, CSU. I enjoy working on research. Programming a computer model that recreates the resonance properties of mouse brain layer V pyramidal cells, creating an EEG controlled robot and simulating EEG data via MATLAB are a few of the research project I've worked on. I am very excited to help improve the Biosensor array here at CSU. I would also like to learn a bit about digital filtering. As far as hobbies, I love to hike in the Rockies, play piano and run. I've recently discovered black and white photography and would like to learn more about the chemistry behind the development process. I have a passion to leave a lasting impact on my world and hope to accomplish that a little bit every day. Taking the time to do the best I can at everything I set my hands to do.

Ryan Selby
Second-Year Fellow, Electrical Engineering

I am currently a first year graduate student in Electrical Engineering at Colorado State University. I also completed my bachelor's degree at CSU, and during my senior year I was able to participate in GK-12 through my Senior Design project. This allowed me to experience the great research within the GK-12 program first hand and made for an easy transition to graduate school. My role in the project is to help design the circuitry that makes the biosensor chip work. So far I have helped design an Analog to Digital converter, and in the future I will be working on low noise, low power amplifiers. I am excited to continue working on the biosensor chip and to help start new science and engineering projects in the high schools!